New Graduate Student FAQ

From ControlWiki

Jump to: navigation, search

This FAQ is directed at incoming graduate students that are interested in sensing, communication, and control, (SCC) or robotics, or systems.


Contents

Graduate Program Overview

This document is a power point presentation given to the incoming graduate students in Fall 2011 outlining our EE program

Graduate Handbook

A Graduate Handbook for students in the Engineering Division is available here. It collects most of the information you will need to progress through the program in one place. Important documents in the handbook are

  • Transfer credit approval form and,
  • The plan of study form

These are located in Appendix 3 of the handbook.

How do I plan my program?

The requirements for your degree are covered in the Graduate Bulletin. You can find a copy of the bulletin here. Click on the appropriate graduate bulletin, and go to the section covering the Engineering Division. For the 2010-2011 bulletin, this is on page 71. The bulletin that covers your program is for the academic year that you begin. Note that if you have been accepted to start in the fall, your bulletin may not yet be published, but the previous year's bulletin should a good approximation.

There are four different specialties that you can choose from: Systems, Electrical, Mechanical, and Civil. If you are reading this, you will probably be choosing from either Electrical or Systems.

The Electrical specialty is further divided into two tracks: Information and Systems Sciences (ISS), and Energy Systems and Power Electronics (ESPE). Once you have decided on a specialty, and perhaps a track within that specialty, there will be a set of core courses that are required. For the Systems specialty, you need to take EGGN 501, EGGN 502, and EGGN 504. For the Electrical Specialty, you will need to take 4 from a restricted list plus EGGN 504.

Beyond these required courses, you will choose electives to fill out your program. It is best that you choose these electives in concert with your permanent advisor, so the sooner your choose a permanent advisor, the better.

Every semester, you should update a plan of study form (Appendix 3, Graduate Hanbook) and make an appointment to go over it with your temporary or permanent advisor. When you fill out the application for candidacy, (required for both MS and PhD students) your advisor will sign, approving the courses you have taken. This plan of study form ensures that your advisor is "on board" for the courses you have decided to take.

Which EGGN504 section should I take?

If you are EE:ISS or are Systems with an interest in control, take EGGN504A. If you are EE:ESPE, or are Systems with an interest in power, take EGGN504B.

I want to take a class that requires a pre-req that I took at another university. What should I do?

E-mail your advisor, (with CWID) and they can let the registar know that you can register for this class without the pre-req

I want to take an undergraduate (499 and below) level class, but the system won't let me register. What should I do?

E-mail your advisor, (with CWID) and they can let the registar know that they should allow this registration.

What is an example first year schedule for someone interested in control systems?

Fall: EGGN504A (seminar), EGGN417 (modern/digital control), *EGGN515 (mathematical methods), *EGGN518 (robot dynamics and control)

Spring: *EGGN517 (advanced control design), *EGGN511 (sparse signal processing), EGGN521 (mechatronics)

Notes: *core course. For thesis (non-thesis) students, this can be supplemented with 5 (11) more credits of classes.

Typical other courses: EGGN589 (design and control of wind energy) EGGN519 Kalman filtering (prereq: 515 and probability theory) EGGN514 advanced robot control

What is an example first year schedule for someone interested in robotics?

Fall: EGGN504A (seminar), (EGGN482 (embedded systems) or EGGN417 (modern control)), *EGGN515 (mathematical methods), *EGGN518 (robot dynamics and control)

Spring: +*EGGN517 (advanced control design), EGGN514 (advanced robot control), EGGN521 (mechatronics)

Notes: *core course. +requires 417 (or equivalent) as pre-req. For thesis (non-thesis) students, this can be supplemented with 5 (11) more credits of classes, one of which must be a core course.

What is an example first year schedule for someone interested in signal processing?

Fall: EGGN504A (seminar), *EGGN515 (mathematical methods), MATH534 (probability theory), EGGN481 (Signal Processing)

Spring: *EGGN511 (sparse signal processing), **EGGN519 (Kalman filtering), +*EGGN517 (advanced control design)

Notes: *core course. **offered odd years. +requires 417 (or equivalent) as pre-req.

For thesis (non-thesis) students, this can be supplemented with 5 (11) more credits of classes, one of which must be a core course.

What is an example first year schedule for someone interested in image processing/computer vision?

Fall: EGGN504A (seminar), *EGGN515 (mathematical methods), *EGGN510 (image processing), EGGN481 (signal processing)

Spring: EGGN512 (computer vision), *EGGN511 (sparse signal processing), **+EGGN519 (Kalman filtering)

Notes: *core course. **offered odd years. +Requires probability theory as pre-requisite.

For thesis (non-thesis) students, this can be supplemented with 5 (11) more credits of classes, one of which must be a core course.

What is an example program for someone interested in Energy Systems and Power Electronics?

Power electronics: EGGN504B, EGGN485, EGGN486, EGGN487, EGGN580, EGGN581, EGGN582, EGGN585, 2 other course credits and 6 thesis credits (MS thesis), or 8 other course credits (MS non-thesis).

Power systems: EGGN504B, EGGN484, EGGN485, EGGN487, EGGN580, EGGN584, EGGN586, EGGN587, 2 other course credits and 6 thesis credits (MS thesis), or 8 other course credits (MS non-thesis).

How do I find a permanent advisor?

Finding a permanent advisor is one of the most imporant things you will do in the first year here. It may take some time as you get to know the faculty, and find a good match. Good strategies are:

  • Take classes from the faculty whose work you are interested it
  • Attend seminars by faculty and current graduate students to find out what projects are going on
  • Ask to attend research meetings
  • Ask to meet with faculty individually

How long does it take to complete my degree?

Typically, for full time students,

  • MS non-thesis is between 1-2 years
  • MS thesis is between 2-3 years
  • PhD is 2-4 years beyond the masters

but everything depends on your particular situation.

How can I get a desk?

You will be assigned a desk by the EG office with priority for TAs, PhD students and Masters thesis students.

Where is form X?

The change of advisor, designation of committee, admission to candidacy, graduation application, and just about every form you need to progress through your graduate career can be found here. Also, check out the graduate school website http://gradschool.mines.edu

Personal tools